Asymptomatic atherosclerosis found on CTA is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction

Clinical Question

How common is asymptomatic coronary atherosclerosis, and what is the subsequent risk of myocardial infarction?

Bottom line

By an average age of 60 years, screening of asymptomatic people using coronary CTA will identify atherosclerosis in approximately 60% of men and 36% of women. A small proportion will have coronary artery partial obstruction. This group, as well as people with extensive atherosclerosis, regardless of level of obstruction, is at higher, but still low, risk of myocardial infarction (MI) over the next few years. This study was not designed to compare the benefit of screening with no screening, and we need more information before we start screening people for atherosclerosis. 1b

Study design: Cohort (prospective)

Funding: Foundation

Setting: Population-based

Reviewer

Allen F. Shaughnessy, PharmD, MMedEd
Professor of Family Medicine
Tufts University
Boston, MA


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Comments

DR ARUP KUMAR DHARA

Impact assessment

Excellent

Roland Michael Grad

Screening?

Do we need a trial to compare the benefit of CTA screening with no CTA screening? Or should we just continue with CVD risk assessment using the Framingham (or other) validated risk calculator?

Anonymous

Well, there’s a sensible…

Well, there’s a sensible study.

Instead of assessing the risk of coronary disease using cholesterol screening and condemning people to a lifetime of medication and copious blood work, just find out if they have coronary disease and treat them if they do. …If they don’t by age 60 they’re unlikely to develop it.

Anonymous

ASYMTOMATIC ATHEROSCLEROSIS FOUND ON CTA

NEWS TO ME